Sat Aug 24, 2019

“Conspiracy Theory” Is Not A Pejorative


If you follow any of the news cycles and process their narrative in any way, you will notice that they are very hostile to any other viewpoints. If somebody contradicts them in a factual or ideological fashion, they instantly dip into the same tiresome accusation, calling the opposition viewpoint(s) a “conspiracy theory”. To parse the overall data as somebody with a brain, over a longer and longer term, you will inevitably come to a similar conclusion. The mainstream media has only one single objective, and that is to relieve you of your liberty and pass it off to the government.

The establishment wants a global tax conglomerate, and you to be their tax slave or their prisoner. Currently, the US Congress consists of 100 Senate members and 435 House representatives. There are 330 million people in the USA and nearly eight billion in the world. We ponder, as troubled minds, how 535 people can ever know and legislate satisfactorily the changing needs of millions or even billions of people. Which spawns, of course, “conspiracy theories”. We like to call it simple logic. Your hosts Frank and Mike explore some historical conspiracies and ask the question(s), are conspiracies as rare and ridiculous as the modern mainstream media would have you believe? Let’s take a look at history for an answer or three.

 

Here are some historical conspiracies we parse and compare to historical facts in order answer the question — Are conspiracies something that happen on a regular basis, even in modern times?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Julius_Caesar

The assassination of Julius Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by many Roman senators led by Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, and Marcus Junius Brutus. They stabbed Julius Caesar to death in a location adjacent to the Theatre of Pompey on the Ides of March (March 15), 44 BC. Caesar was the dictator of the Roman Republic, having recently been declared dictator perpetuo by the Senate of the Roman Republic. This declaration made several senators fear that Caesar wanted to overthrow the Senate in favor of tyranny. The conspirators were unable to restore the Roman Republic, and the ramifications of the assassination led to the Liberators’ civil war and ultimately to the Principate period of the Roman Empire.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_Committee

The Church Committee was the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, a U.S. Senate committee chaired by Idaho Senator Frank Church in 1975. The committee investigated abuses by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), National Security Agency (NSA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The committee was part of a series of investigations into intelligence abuses during the mid-1970s, including the Watergate Hearings, the Rockefeller Commission, and the Pike Committee. One result of the committee’s efforts was the establishment of the permanent U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_Kitty

Acoustic Kitty was a CIA project launched by the Central Intelligence Agency Directorate of Science & Technology, which in the 1960s intended to use cats to spy on the Kremlin and Soviet embassies. In an hour-long procedure, a veterinary surgeon implanted a microphone in the cat’s ear canal, a small radio transmitter at the base of its skull and a thin wire into its fur. This would allow the cat to innocuously record and transmit sound from its surroundings. Due to problems with distraction, the cat’s sense of hunger had to be addressed in another operation.Victor Marchetti, a former CIA officer, said Project Acoustic Kitty cost about $20 million.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mockingbird

Operation Mockingbird was an alleged large-scale program of the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) that began in the early 1950s and attempted to manipulate news media for propaganda purposes. It funded student and cultural organizations and magazines as front organizations.

According to writer Deborah Davis, Operation Mockingbird recruited leading American journalists into a propaganda network and oversaw the operations of front groups. CIA support of front groups was exposed after a 1967 Ramparts magazine article reported that the National Student Association received funding from the CIA. In the 1970s, Congressional investigations and reports also revealed Agency connections with journalists and civic groups. None of these reports, however, mentions an Operation Mockingbird coordinating or supporting these activities.

A Project Mockingbird is mentioned in the CIA Family Jewels report, compiled in the mid-1970s. According to the declassified version of the report released in 2007, Project Mockingbird involved the wire-tapping of two American journalists for several months in the early 1960s.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-02-23/1967-he-cia-created-phrase-conspiracy-theorists-and-ways-attack-anyone-who-challenge

The CIA Coined the Term Conspiracy Theorist In 1967 Specifically, in April 1967, the CIA wrote a dispatch which coined the term “conspiracy theories” … and recommended methods for discrediting such theories.  The dispatch was marked “psych” –  short for “psychological operations” or disinformation –  and “CS” for the CIA’s “Clandestine Services” unit. The dispatch was produced in responses to a Freedom of Information Act request by the New York Times in 1976.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Northwoods

https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu//news/20010430/northwoods.pdf

Operation Northwoods was a proposed false flag operation against the Cuban government that originated within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) of the United States government in 1962. The proposals called for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) or other U.S. government operatives to commit acts of terrorism against American civilians and military targets, blaming it on the Cuban government, and using it to justify a war against Cuba. The plans detailed in the document included the possible assassination of Cuban émigrés, sinking boats of Cuban refugees on the high seas, hijacking planes, blowing up a U.S. ship, and orchestrating violent terrorism in U.S. cities. The proposals were rejected by the Kennedy administration.

At the time of the proposal, communists led by Fidel Castro had recently taken power in Cuba. The operation proposed creating public support for a war against Cuba by blaming it for terrorist acts that would actually be perpetrated by the U.S. Government. To this end, Operation Northwoods proposals recommended hijackings and bombings followed by the introduction of phony evidence that would implicate the Cuban government.